thepehbat:

GUESS WHAT DAY IT IS!

thepehbat:

GUESS WHAT DAY IT IS!

verilyvexed:

I cannot articulate how much I wish there was an option in Dragon Age to make your companions romance each other.

verilyvexed:

I cannot articulate how much I wish there was an option in Dragon Age to make your companions romance each other.

Who needs sleep
Barenaked Ladies

40 plays

a-mi-zivi:

Endless list of my favourite songs (8/?)

There’s so much joy in life,
so many pleasures all around
But the pleasure of insomnia
is one I’ve never found
With all life has to offer,
there’s so much to be enjoyed
But the pleasures of insomnia
are ones I can’t avoid

penisparker:

notdaredevil:

penisparker:

i’ve got a phd in the art of not giving a shit

you can’t get a doctorate in art

i don’t give a shit

blue-eyed-hanji:

koryos:

i have a really hard time ending novels

a really hard time

there is more truth in this than in wold history books

afrafemme:

Teaching Consent to Small Children

A friend and I were out with our kids when another family’s two-year-old came up. She began hugging my friend’s 18-month-old, following her around and smiling at her. My friend’s little girl looked like she wasn’t so sure she liked this, and at that moment the other little girl’s mom came up and got down on her little girl’s level to talk to her.

“Honey, can you listen to me for a moment? I’m glad you’ve found a new friend, but you need to make sure to look at her face to see if she likes it when you hug her. And if she doesn’t like it, you need to give her space. Okay?”

Two years old, and already her mother was teaching her about consent.

My daughter Sally likes to color on herself with markers. I tell her it’s her body, so it’s her choice. Sometimes she writes her name, sometimes she draws flowers or patterns. The other day I heard her talking to her brother, a marker in her hand.

“Bobby, do you mind if I color on your leg?”

Bobby smiled and moved himself closer to his sister. She began drawing a pattern on his leg with a marker while he watched, fascinated. Later, she began coloring on the sole of his foot. After each stoke, he pulled his foot back, laughing. I looked over to see what was causing the commotion, and Sally turned to me.

“He doesn’t mind if I do this,” she explained, “he is only moving his foot because it tickles. He thinks its funny.” And she was right. Already Bobby had extended his foot to her again, smiling as he did so.

What I find really fascinating about these two anecdotes is that they both deal with the consent of children not yet old enough to communicate verbally. In both stories, the older child must read the consent of the younger child through nonverbal cues. And even then, consent is not this ambiguous thing that is difficult to understand.

Teaching consent is ongoing, but it starts when children are very young. It involves both teaching children to pay attention to and respect others’ consent (or lack thereof) and teaching children that they should expect their own bodies and their own space to be respected—even by their parents and other relatives.

And if children of two or four can be expected to read the nonverbal cues and expressions of children not yet old enough to talk in order to assess whether there is consent, what excuse do full grown adults have?

snakewife:

Sometimes when you learn your English primarily through reading, you imagine how certain words sound. Sometimes you never think to correct yourself because surely you heard it somewhere, right?

"Why does Boyfriend keep saying ‘segway’?" I wondered. "Does he mean segue?"

image

There’s no such word as seeg, Stan. No one has ever seeged into a topic. You have been wrong for over two decades of using the word segue.

criedwolves:

kiss kiss fall down stairs

criedwolves:

kiss kiss fall down stairs

curlyhurrdoncurr:

pleasurechest:

tiggerbounced:

thelandofmaps:

Average SAT Score by State [940x371]CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS!thelandofmaps.tumblr.com

WHAT.

Kind of misleading. In the orange and red states the SAT is pretty much required. Meaning anywhere from 80 to 90% of the students take it where as in many midwest states <5% take the exam and instead they focus on taking the ACT. This means it’s mostly top-tier students who choose to take the SAT whether it be dreams of Ivy League or bragging rights, who knows. Essentially you’re looking at the results of a selection bias.

Another reason why that SAT map is horribly misleading is that it only provides surface level information. In order to create a better map, we need to know:
1. How many teens have taken the SATs. 
2. Report of scores (need to come from a non-biased source, such as The College Board).
3. School districts (meaning, we need to get down to at least county level).
4. The averaged scores by school district (NOTE: education in this country is seriously unequal and the average of this score can be majorly skewed by underfunded/highly funded schools!). 
Once you have those stats, you then have to account for counties that may have more than one school district. They need to be sectioned out in order to stand on their own (if school district-specific geo data does not exist). 
After that base map is established, then you can go into distribution of scores according to a scale that makes sense (Why does the original scale start at 1475 and end at 1825 when scores range from 600 to 2400?). 
And then once the map itself has been created with the average SAT scores of school districts spread across the U.S., you then use a color scheme that best highlights the range. For quantitative data, you either use one color gradually (i.e. lavender to royal to showcase the strength of their scores) or a color family (light tan —> yellow —> orange —> red). Colorbrewer is perfect for this: http://colorbrewer2.org (I used this site all the time for my maps in GIS!). Multicolored/no color pattern is used for qualitative data.
Finally, the title needs to actually match your data. For example, “Average SAT Scores of School Districts Required to take the SAT”. Okay, so that’s a bad title because it’s redundant, but it let’s the viewer know upfront what they’re supposed to be looking at.
To go a step further, do this for school districts that require the ACT. 
Maps!

curlyhurrdoncurr:

pleasurechest:

tiggerbounced:

thelandofmaps:

Average SAT Score by State [940x371]
CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS!
thelandofmaps.tumblr.com

WHAT.

Kind of misleading. In the orange and red states the SAT is pretty much required. Meaning anywhere from 80 to 90% of the students take it where as in many midwest states <5% take the exam and instead they focus on taking the ACT. This means it’s mostly top-tier students who choose to take the SAT whether it be dreams of Ivy League or bragging rights, who knows. Essentially you’re looking at the results of a selection bias.

Another reason why that SAT map is horribly misleading is that it only provides surface level information. In order to create a better map, we need to know:

1. How many teens have taken the SATs. 

2. Report of scores (need to come from a non-biased source, such as The College Board).

3. School districts (meaning, we need to get down to at least county level).

4. The averaged scores by school district (NOTE: education in this country is seriously unequal and the average of this score can be majorly skewed by underfunded/highly funded schools!)

Once you have those stats, you then have to account for counties that may have more than one school district. They need to be sectioned out in order to stand on their own (if school district-specific geo data does not exist). 

After that base map is established, then you can go into distribution of scores according to a scale that makes sense (Why does the original scale start at 1475 and end at 1825 when scores range from 600 to 2400?). 

And then once the map itself has been created with the average SAT scores of school districts spread across the U.S., you then use a color scheme that best highlights the range. For quantitative data, you either use one color gradually (i.e. lavender to royal to showcase the strength of their scores) or a color family (light tan —> yellow —> orange —> red). Colorbrewer is perfect for this: http://colorbrewer2.org (I used this site all the time for my maps in GIS!). Multicolored/no color pattern is used for qualitative data.

Finally, the title needs to actually match your data. For example, “Average SAT Scores of School Districts Required to take the SAT”. Okay, so that’s a bad title because it’s redundant, but it let’s the viewer know upfront what they’re supposed to be looking at.

To go a step further, do this for school districts that require the ACT. 

Maps!

Here (In Your Arms)
Hellogoodbye
Zombies! Aliens! Vampires! Dinosaurs!
27,147 plays

the-sweetest-melody:

Hellogoodbye - Here (In Your Arms)

gorgonetta:

I was going to write a well-argued essay about why the Buzzfeed “reasons why librarians are cool” article is really problematic, but I’m tired, what with fighting institutionalized bullshit every fucking day at my job.  Instead, I’ll just point out that if you need to first vilify older women and mock the necessity for quiet, safety, and behavioral intervention in library spaces before talking about why [pick all that apply: young, male, hipster, lazy, flashy] librarians are “cool,” than you are not only an ignorant piece of shit, but you suffer from a stunning lack of creativity.  If you share such articles uncritically, especially in a work context, you are part of the fucking problem.

cannibalcoalition:

You know what?

I don’t care if being a lesbian isn’t natural.

Its 2014. Oreos don’t have a single natural ingredient in them that isn’t distilled out of recognition. People get their vegetables from cans. They have made cruelty-free, lab-grown BACON. People fly around in big, metal machines.

I. AM. TALKING. TO SOMEONE. ACROSS THE WORLD. IN A MATTER OF SECONDS.

Not natural. Is not bad.

Your rhetoric is no longer a valid excuse for hate.

smashsurvey:

Now think of how many of those female characters and protagonists are oversexed, created for the male gaze, or put in an inactive damsel role for the plot of the game. Representation matters. A Study last year proved that exposure to tv shows increased the self esteem of young white boys and markedly decreased the confidence and self esteem of girls across the board (and we haven’t even started on the representation of characters of color and the effect it has on children’s self perception). 

Video games are a different media, and even more concerning if representation metrics are changing how our kids think of themselves. Especially knowing that 67% of American Households have video game consoles and 91% of Children play video games regularlyhow do you think the portrayal (and lack of portrayals) of women and girls in these games is affecting little girls – or influencing how little boys view their importance and/or influence over them? 

Comics. Movies. Lit. Pop Culture. The Smash Survey is an upcoming podcast project that will critically explore the representation of race, gender, and queer identity in media and pop culture in a fun and engaging format. 

vegansara:

Kissing is cool. Light kissing, kissing on the cheek, kissing someone’s forehead. Kissing hard and biting and when someone holds your face with both their hands and kisses you some more. Man. Gimme all the kisses.